Do It Myself Blog – Glenda Watson Hyatt

Motivational Speaker

Readers Café: Times Are Changing

Filed under: Readers Cafe — by Glenda at 4:00 pm on Wednesday, September 5, 2007

Oceanside café
(Photo credit: Niels Rameckers)

Hi and welcome to the Readers’ Café – a place to gather and to share. Tonight we’re at a café in Meemu Atoll, Maldives. (I’m hanging onto the last bit of summer as long as I can!)

Please join us and help yourself to a beverage of your choice. Then sit back, enjoy the lingering summer evening and join in the conversation by posting comments below. Hit your internet browser’s REFRESH button to see new comments as others join in the conversation. All that I ask is that you respect others and keep it relatively family-friendly. Also, keep in mind that this is a public space, so share what you feel comfortable sharing publicly.

With autumn unofficially here (in the northern hemisphere), kids are going back to school and parents are attempting to establish a normal routine. This means new teachers, new classmates or even new schools, and perhaps even new jobs, which can cause new stresses or challenges. Transition seems the appropriate topic for today’s discussion.

My husband Darrell’s first podcast provides a few suggestions for easing kids back into the school routine. (A transcript is also available.)

What are some of the challenges or stresses you (or your child) faces when transitioning? (This might be to a new grade, a new school, a new home, a new job or whatever.) How have you handled it? What strategies do you use?

If you enjoyed this post, consider buying me a chai tea latte. Thanks kindly.

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62 Comments »

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 4:10 pm

Hi Glenda! Hi Darrell (if you’re about, congratulations on the podcast. I’ll listen to it later).

India is one place I’ve often wanted to visit.

Comment by Darrell

September 5, 2007 @ 4:11 pm

Hi Glenda

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:13 pm

Welcome Rick and Darrell.

Yes, I had my geography lesson earlier today, learning where Maldives is and about atolls.

Comment by Becky McCray, Small Town Entrepreneur

September 5, 2007 @ 4:15 pm

Hi, Glenda! I loved reading the introduction to the cafe tonight. Just dropped in to say hi before I grab a bite to eat. I’ll drop back by soon!

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:18 pm

Hi Becky, welcome! Enjoy your bite. I’m munching on granola bars in between typing.

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 4:19 pm

I’ll be the first to admit I don’t deal well with change. Sweaty palms. Jumpy stomach. The little voice that says “Let’s do this later.” I either have to sneak up on it or jump right into it to get it over with.

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:22 pm

Rick, does it depend upon the type of change? Or, is each one a sweaty, jumpy kind of affair?

Comment by Darrell

September 5, 2007 @ 4:25 pm

Rick you are not alone, change is not my favorite thing either.

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 4:27 pm

For me it mostly depends on how closely the situation resembles something I’ve done before for the most part. Like when you’re a kid. Starting school was a real shock. Going to the next grade less of one. Going into second grade is old hat.

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:28 pm

Rick and Darrell, what would make change easier to deal with? What bothers you about change?

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:29 pm

So Rick, fear of the unknown?

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 4:32 pm

Not necessarily. More like not knowing if I will be able to cope with what happens.

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:32 pm

As January 1, 1988 – the day I left for university – came closer, I was sure my chest pains would become a heart attack. Scary.

Comment by Darrell

September 5, 2007 @ 4:33 pm

i just get use to things the way they are and then things change

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:35 pm

Interesting Rick. So more your coping skills than the unknown?

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 4:37 pm

I can imagine it would be, Glenda. I had an anxiety attack once. My wife and I were sure I was having a heart attack.

What do you all think. Is it the fear of the unknown in itself, or the thought of not knowing how to cope with what is coming?

Comment by Becky McCray, Small Town Entrepreneur

September 5, 2007 @ 4:38 pm

We’re grilling burgers. mmmmm. Change, transition. Time marches on, my husband says. Wrenching though change may be!

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 4:40 pm

If I hadn’t just had a good plate of spaghetti, I would be getting hungry thinking about your burgers, Becky. :)

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:43 pm

Rick, for me, it is probably more the unknown. Not knowing what is coming at me.

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:44 pm

Becky, I’ll be right over!

Comment by Darrell

September 5, 2007 @ 4:45 pm

Becky Have a burger for me please

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 4:46 pm

You’ll make it to Becky’s in no time with that hot new Ferrari, Glenda!

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:48 pm

lol yeah, sure Rick!

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:51 pm

I find this conversation interesting. If we, as adults, find change nervewracking, how terrifying is it for kids, particularly if you add on a disability?

Comment by Becky McCray, Small Town Entrepreneur

September 5, 2007 @ 4:53 pm

I’ll throw an extra burger or two on. Glenda, if you bring that Ferrari, we can race! I’m getting pretty good at TRANSITIONING to that stick shift!

Comment by Avril

September 5, 2007 @ 4:54 pm

Well, I may be an oddity, because I’ve always thrived on change. In fact, when things have been the same for too long, I have a tendency to toss my life up in the air just to see where the pieces land. They always land somewhere interesting. …Well, OK, almost always! By the way, you guys with the BBQ are making me hungry.

Comment by Avril

September 5, 2007 @ 4:55 pm

By the way, what’s the code for “end italics” when you want to go back to roman type?

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:57 pm

Welcome Avril! Perhaps you could share your secrets for handling change.

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 4:58 pm

Avril, try ‘< / i>‘ – without the spaces.

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 5:01 pm

Hi Avril! It should be </i>. If that doesn’t show up, it’s the same as “begin italics”, but put in /i between the less than and greater than signs, instead of just a ‘i’.

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 5:05 pm

As with adults, it depends on the child.

Our oldest son was fairly severely ADHD, a relatively minor disability, but it caused him to have a great deal of difficulty with any change. As Darrell said in his podcast (great job, Darrell :) ), we had to keep as much familiarity in new situations as possible for him, and keep things as structured as possible so he had a safe framework to operate from.

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:08 pm

Sounds like a good strategy, Rick (and Darrell). Any other strategies?

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:10 pm

I imagine the familiar has a calming effect, Rick?

Comment by Darrell

September 5, 2007 @ 5:12 pm

support is always helpful

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 5:15 pm

It did on him, Glenda. I suppose on most of us. It’s like that old coat that may look like heck but it fits and it’s comfy, even though it has stains and a hole. Maybe that’s part of the secret of good luck charms. They’re a piece of familiarity we can take around with us.

Comment by Avril

September 5, 2007 @ 5:15 pm

Thanks for the italics tip. I’m HTML-illiterate. Now I’m one step less illiterate!

My secrets for handling change…hmmm…I feel like it’s almost unfair for me to say, since I think I’m just naturally predisposed to enjoy change. I tend to be curious – and I have a low boredom threshold! But that said, some changes have been catastrophic, and what I do then is try to create a safe haven by surrounding myself as much as possible with familiar things and people, and creating routines that give me a sense of structure. (Normally I hate routines, but at times of overwhelming change they can be a great comfort.)

I also write a lot when I’m feeling unsettled.

Comment by Matt Charron

September 5, 2007 @ 5:16 pm

Handle change? By putting it in a jar and saving it for later! Ha ha!

“Seriously” though, I find that the closer I can live in the moment, change becomes irrelevant to me. Losing attachment to my ego and expectations helps to neutralize the inevitable changes that come every day.

Cheers!

PS: Maldives eh? Are they almost underwater?

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:16 pm

Definitely Darrell, support from parents, friends and teachers – or spouses. :)

Comment by Avril

September 5, 2007 @ 5:17 pm

…and support from furry animals too!

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 5:19 pm

Support is definitely helpful. Some way to know you’re not alone.

Avril, why do you think the writing helps?

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:21 pm

Interesting perspective, Matt, and welcome!

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 5:22 pm

Glenda, I’ve got an off-topic question. Have you had the number of comments here that the numbers indicate?

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:23 pm

Yes Avril, furry critters! Mine is laying on ‘her’ box on my desk, right beside me.

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:25 pm

Rick, yes, I believe so, but many, many spam!

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 5:27 pm

Even if most of it is spam, you’ve done a great job to get that many comments. Me hat’s off to you, ma’am.

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:27 pm

Is planned change easier to handle than unexpected change?

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 5:28 pm

Matt, your perspective is one I’ve been trying to develop for a long time.

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:30 pm

Thanks Rick, here’s the ‘real’ numbers:

Blog Stats
There are currently 94 posts and 479 comments, contained within 10 categories.

Comment by Rick Cockrum

September 5, 2007 @ 5:30 pm

I’m going to bid you all goodnight. Thank you, Glenda.

For my part, I would rather deal with unexpected change. I don’t know why.

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:33 pm

Thanks Rick for coming by. Have a good evening.

Comment by Darrell

September 5, 2007 @ 5:34 pm

night Rick

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:50 pm

Just found this interesting perspective on change:

There is a certain relief in change, even though it be from bad to worse! As I have often found in travelling in a stagecoach, that it is often a comfort to shift one’s position, and be bruised in a new place. ~Washington Irving

Comment by Avril

September 5, 2007 @ 5:52 pm

Hi all, I just left for a while to finish some data entry (could my life be any more exciting??). Rick asked me a question about why writing, and now I see he’s left the party. In case anyone else is interested in why, my answer is that I find that writing things down helps me clarify my thinking and gives me a kind of foundation when my boat is rocking too dangerously. Glenda, do you find the same thing, since you’re a REAL writer?

Comment by Avril

September 5, 2007 @ 5:55 pm

Love the interesting perspective on change you just sent, Glenda! I think I agree with him. In response to an earlier question you posed, yes, I do think planned change is easier to handle than unexpected change. So of course I’m curious about Rick’s response that he’d rather deal with unexpected change. I guess I’ll never know!

That said, unexpected change can be a lot of fun, when it’s the right kind of change!

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 5:55 pm

Here’s one that makes you pay attention:

The only difference between a rut and a grave is their dimensions. ~Ellen Glasgow

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 6:02 pm

Avril, for me, writing is a way to solidify and express an idea or thought [sometimes!]. Other times I just NEED to write; its almost therapeutic or catharic, otherwise I get ‘witchy’ – to which Darrell can attest.

Comment by Darrell

September 5, 2007 @ 6:09 pm

I would never agree you get “witchy”, I love you:)

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 6:10 pm

Here’s one for you, Darrell:

If nothing ever changed, there’d be no butterflies. ~Author Unknown

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 6:12 pm

Ahh, Darrell, I love you too! ;)

Comment by Glenda

September 5, 2007 @ 7:03 pm

Thank you everyone for coming. It has been an enjoyable conversation. Please come again in two weeks for the next Reader’s Cafe.

I’ll leave you with this thought:

Continuity gives us roots; change gives us branches, letting us stretch and grow and reach new heights. ~Pauline R. Kezer

Comment by RennyBA

September 8, 2007 @ 2:44 pm

I’m here from FaceBook and your fan club group. This is my first visit to your blog and I’m impressed – yours are great and very readable.
I love to make new blog friends all over the world and if you have the time, I gladly share my daily experience from Norway on my blog.

Btw: Your husbands podcast was great to listen too – tell him to keep up the good work too!

Comment by Debbie Havusha

September 10, 2007 @ 3:02 pm

Like they say….Change is dynamic but if it too dynamic for someone who is not supported enough it can be dynamite!!
Love your blog Glenda.
All the best,
Debbie Havusha

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